Allied Health Professionals

Every day, allied health professionals play a crucial role in treating, rehabilitating and improving the lives of patients.

The fourteen allied health professions are as follows:

  1. Art therapists
  2. Dietitians
  3. Dramatherapists
  4. Music therapists
  5. Occupational therapists
  6. Operating department practitioners
  7. Orthoptists
  8. Osteopaths
  9. Paramedics
  10. Physiotherapists
  11. Podiatrists
  12. Prosthetists and orthotists
  13. Radiographers
  14. Speech and language therapists

AHP Society

Lincolnshire Training Hub organises regular face-to-face society evenings for AHPs working in Primary Care with a meal and speaker. For details of upcoming events, contact Stacey.mayo1@nhs.net

AHP Ambassador

Our AHP Ambassador is Dipika Khanal. Dipika is a physiotherapist and is keen to support communication and collaboration between AHPs working in Lincolnshire Primary Care.

You can contact Dipika at Dipika.khanal@nhs.net

Career Pathways

For further information, including roadmaps, go to: Resources – Lincolnshire Training Hub

Support worker

  • These are unqualified roles that allow future physios to gain valuable experience and insights. As support workers, they cannot call themselves a physiotherapist (as it is a protected title) and they do not need to be registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). However, they are expected to adhere to the professional values and behaviours as set out by the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP).
  • Physiotherapy support workers may be eligible to study for a Level 6 apprenticeship which will enable them to qualify as a physiotherapist.

Registered Physiotherapists

  • Qualified physiotherapists through University degree or apprenticeship routes are required to register with the HCPC and CSP.
  • They start their clinical practice at Band 5 and will be able to start working on progressing in their career pathway within 12-18 months into Band 6 roles.

Specialised areas of Physiotherapy practice

  • Through masters degrees (MSc) physiotherapists are able to progress into specialised areas of clinical practice such as musculoskeletal physiotherapy, neurological physiotherapy, podiatry, respiratory, etc.
  • Specialised skills such as injection therapy and non medical prescribing can also be acquired through

Musculoskeletal First Contact Physiotherapy Practitioners (Enhanced practice level)

Advanced Practitioner

An AP is a clinician working at an advanced level across all four pillars of advanced practice at master’s level.
The four pillars include: Research, Leadership and Management, Education and Clinical Practice.

Support worker

  • These are unqualified roles that allow future OTS to gain valuable experience and insights. As support workers, they cannot call themselves an OT (as it is a protected title) and they do not need to be registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). However, they are expected to adhere to the professional values and behaviours as set out by the Royal college of occupational therapists.
  • support workers may be eligible to study for a Level 6 apprenticeship which will enable them to qualify as an OT.
  • https://www.rcot.co.uk/about-occupational-therapy/become-an-occupational-therapist/become-ot-support-worker

Registered OTS

Specialised areas of Occupational therapy practice

Through clinical placements in specialised areas, such as elderly care or services for children, OTS can practice in specialised areas. This could be furthered by an MSc degree.

Currently, OTs are not able to train as independent prescribers. A case has been made in 2021 about why OTS should be provided with an opportunity to train as prescribers but a decision hasn’t yet been made.

https://www.rcslt.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/02/Q-A.pdf

First Contact and Advanced Practice Roadmap for OTS

Registered OTs with experience in their occupational therapy practice can progress and choose to work as First Contact OTS subject to meeting the requirements set by the Health Education England and NHSE.

They can also work towards getting the digital badge for AP registration through the portfolio or university taught routes.

https://www.hee.nhs.uk/our-work/allied-health-professions/enable-workforce/roadmaps-practice-0

https://www.hee.nhs.uk/sites/default/files/documents/multi-professionalframeworkforadvancedclinical practiceinengland.pdf

After Completing School

Bachelor’s Degree: Obtain a degree in dietetics or a related field from an accredited university. Programs typically last three to four years and must be approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Master’s Degree (optional): Some of you may choose to pursue a master’s degree in dietetics or a related area.

Band 5 Dietitian: Begin as a newly qualified dietitian, usually starting at Band 5 on the NHS Agenda for Change pay scale. Responsibilities include providing dietary advice, conducting nutritional assessments, and developing care plans for patients.

Progression based on experience and skill set to Band 6 and above as with other AHP roles in NHS and private settings.

https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/dietitian

Specialised areas of practices

You could specialise in a clinical area, such as cancer or diabetes or  work with particular groups; such as elderly people or those with learning difficulties. Teaching and health education are also options.

Leadership and Specialist roles: This could include Band 8a-8b / Consultant positions managing teams, working at strategic planning levels, conducting advanced research.

Academic/ Education sector roles: This could include working at University/ research sectors.
You could take on a management role where you would supervise the work of a team of dietitians. Eventually, you could be responsible for controlling a budget and planning and marketing a dietetic service.

Dietitians are not able to train as independent prescribers currently as like OTs. They can prescribe under an agreed Clinical management plan.

You could work in sports nutrition or the food industry. Some dietitians move into marketing roles such as publishing, sales and public relations.

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/allied-health-professionals/roles-allied-health-professions/dietitian

First Contact and Advanced Practice Roadmap for Dietitians

Similar to other AHP roles, the roadmap for enhanced and advanced Podiatry practice has been set by the HEE and NHSE.

https://www.hee.nhs.uk/sites/default/files/documents/Dietetic-Nov21%20FILLABLE_1.pdf

After Completing School

 

  1. Taking the podiatry degree apprenticeship (in England), whilst still working as a support worker
  2. Speaking to the nearest podiatry school to ask them at what level their current training maps onto their degree programme; it may be possible to complete the degree in less time, if a support worker already holds certain core skills or knowledge
  3. If a support worker already holds a degree in any other subject, they can do the pre-registration Masters and become qualified after two-years of full-time study. (https://rcpod.org.uk/careers/support-worker-pathways)
  • After successfully completing the required qualification through any of the routes above, you will need to register with the Health and Care Professions Council.

Specialised areas of practices

  • This could include specialised practice through placements and practice experience in the field of professional sports, podiatric surgery, diabetes, wound care, rehabilitation, forensic podiatry, education and research. This can be in the NHS or within private healthcare organisations or through Private practice.
  • https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/podiatrist
  • Within the NHS, there is a structured career path. With experience and further training, you can progress through the grades:
  • entry level podiatrist (band 5)
  • specialist (band 6)
  • team leader or advanced podiatrist (band 7)
  • specialist registrar in podiatric surgery (band 8a – d)
  • consultant podiatric surgeon (band 9).
  • Podiatrists can undertake non-medical prescribing training and become independent
  • prescribers while working within their scope of practice.